Do You Want to Be Buried With Your Family?

Whether you believe in an afterlife or simply view death as being absolutely final—both for your physical body and your consciousness—the only certainty of death is that something needs to be done with your remains. For most people, the ultimate fate of their remains involves burial or cremation. But then what?

If you find comfort in the idea that your final resting place will be alongside those who you loved in life, have you considered the possibility of being buried with your family? In some instances, you can be buried in a casket alongside your family, but sometimes cremation is the more practical option. Discover specific possibilities of family burial, including with cremation remains.

Double Grave

Not all burial plots have to be single occupancy. When your family is small, consisting of just you and your partner, the two of you can often be buried together.

Grave Depth

Standard industry practice in many countries requires graves to be dug to a depth of six feet (or 1.83 metres). This is not the case in Australia. Here, graves are often dug deeper to allow for an additional casket to be buried on top of the first casket.

Double Occupancy

This additional burial depth in Australia means that when you or your partner passes away, the burial can take place as usual. When the remaining person passes away, their casket can be buried in the same plot. The headstone can then be updated to include the names and biographical details of both people buried.

Different Choices

What if you and your partner have different ideas about the ultimate fate of your remains? If you wanted to be buried and your partner wanted to be cremated, cremated remains can be buried atop an already buried casket or vice versa.

Interment of Cremated Remains

Cremation and burial are seen as two separate options, but cremated remains can be buried to create a final resting place.

Cremated Ashes

Ashes come in a standard plastic container the size of a tissue box (25cm x 14cm x 12cm). These usually get interned into wherever they are meant to go.

Space Considerations

This is a question of physical mass, and cremated remains will take up far less space than intact remains inside a casket. This means that multiple family members in their respective containers can potentially be laid to rest in a single plot.

Family Plot

This is often the most expensive way for your family to be buried together, and it really depends on your budget. You can purchase multiple plots alongside each other, creating a family burial plot.

Forward Planning

You can’t know how many family members will ultimately use the plot. A point may come where only enough space exists for newly interred family members to be cremated and placed inside a burial urn, but this permits everyone to be included so you can all be laid to rest together.

Family Mausoleum

A family mausoleum will also require some upfront costs, although the subsequent burial costs will usually be lower than a family plot. The primary cost will be the purchase of the plot to host the mausoleum, along with the construction of the mausoleum itself.

Future Residents

All family members who wish to be interred in the mausoleum will not face the costs of a traditional burial. The mausoleum is simply opened, and their remains are placed inside. Just as with a family plot, more of your family can be housed in a mausoleum if everyone opts for cremation.

So if you want your final resting place to be with your family, talk to us about your options for everyone to be laid to rest together.